Yorkshire Terrier Print

The diminutive Yorkie is the 21st breed in my Dog Tag series of prints.

Yorkshire Terrier print unframed

Bred in England as an expert exterminator of vermin in 19th Century mills, mines and factories, this feisty terrier was also a handy pocket sized hunter’s companion, with enough guts to flush out badgers and foxes from their dens.

Yorkshire Terrier print -hand lettered detail

Originally known as the Broken Haired Scotch or Toy Terrier the Yorkies were re-named after a reporter at a show was heard to exclaim that the breed had much improved since it had been in Yorkshire!

It was not long before this tiny and devoted breed made the transition from its working class roots to high society, when it caught the attention of Victorian well-to-do ladies, for whom it became a playful companion and pampered pet.

Yorkshire Terrier print in reclaimed wood frame

Keen of eye and sharp of tongue, what the Yorkie lacks in size it certainly makes up for in spirit. Sprightly and self-important, with a silky steel blue and golden coat, the Yorkshire Terrier remains a terrier at heart.

The print is available framed or unframed from The Enlightened Hound

 

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Dog is my Co-Pilot – Reduction Linoprint

I was approached by cool UK company, Pedlars, to do an exclusive print under the title “Dog is my Co-Pilot”. Pedlars sells quirky and original home-wares & gifts, both vintage and new. A love of dogs has always been a central theme of the company.

Dog is my Co-Pilot print

Inspired by pop art propaganda posters with their simple graphics and strong colours, this print is a 3 colour reduction linoprint.

Dog is my CoPilot print close up

A limited edition of 50 A3 prints were produced. Once these are sold there will never be any more printed because the process of making a reduction linoprint destroys the very printing plate that is used to create the prints – this is why it is sometimes called a suicide print!

You can see the finished print on the Pedlars website. If you’d like to find out more about the process of creating this print – read on!

First, the design for the print has to be drawn on to the piece of lino that will become the printing plate. It has to be drawn in reverse so that it is the right way round when it is printed (particularly important if there is any typography!)

Linoprint Plate1

Then, all the areas of the image that will not be printed (i.e. that will remain the colour of the paper used for printing) need to be carefully cut away. This is how my plate looked after this was done.

Linoprint plate2

This plate was then used to print the first of the three colours. The first colour (red in my case) will cover much of the print after the first pass through the press, but in the final print much of the red will be covered up by the printing of subsequent colours.

So, before I got started on the printing, I wanted to check how the three colours I would be using for the print looked when they were printed over/under each other. This would determine the order in which the colours would be printed. If, for example, I found out half way through the printing that the light blue did not cover the red effectively, or made an unwanted third colour (like purple!) it would be too late to go back and start again as the printing plate will have been cut away for the second colour – and once the lino is cut, there’s no going back!

So here are the results of that little experiment…

printmaking colour test

… I use traditional oil based printing inks – they look almost good enough to eat!

Red Ink

Here is the first colour printed.

reduction linoprint first colour

All 50 (plus a few spare) prints are printed in red at once. Then I return to the plate and cut away all the areas that I want to keep as red in the finished print. Here is the plate at this stage….

Linoplate 3

Now I print the next colour – the lighter of the 2 blues. The trickiest part of a reduction linoprint is making sure that the paper goes down on the plate in exactly the same place every time a new colour is printed, to avoid unwanted overlap of colour and keep nice sharp lines (although sometimes mis-registered prints can look really effective too). This is why it is good practice to print more than you hope to end up with in the final edition – because mistakes are bound to be made along the way! Perhaps this is another reason why it is called the suicide print!

Here is the second colour printed….

Reduction Linoprint Second Colour

prints drying

Now all the areas that will remain light blue are cut away from the lino plate… here is the newly cut plate on my press being inked up with the final very dark blue ink.

Printing Press

Ta Daaaa! The final print

Linoprint Dog is my CoPilot

Dog is my CoPilot print detail

Golden Retriever Original Print

Here is the 8th breed in my dog tag print series – the Golden Retriever. This well known and loved breed is also adored by over 160 celebrity owners including Martha Stewart, Ronal Reagan, Oprah Winfrey, Elizabeth Taylor, Jerry Seinfeld, Jackie Chan and Christopher Reeve.

Golden Retriever Print

The  Golden Retriever was developed by the wonderfully named British aristocrat, Lord Tweedmouth, in the late 1800s, as a handsome and practical gentleman’s hunting companion. Tweedmouth was an avid hunter and well connected gentleman in Victorian society.

In 1865 Lord Tweedmouth bought the only yellow pup from a litter of black wavy coated retrievers and crossed him with the (now extinct) Tweed Water Spaniel, a rugged water dog with excellent retrieving abilities. He wanted to create the perfect sporting dog to retrieve upland game and waterfowl on his Scottish estate, but also an animal that was handsome and of a biddable, sweet disposition — an ideal a family pet.
Today’s Golden Retrievers are a testament to those early ideals.

Golden Retriever Art Print

Handsome as a Hollywood movie star, sensitive and intelligent companions, with smiling faces and heart-melting eyes, its hard to resist the allure of a Golden! Their inherent retrieving instinct and strong desire to please their people means that they love to carry things in their mouths – shoes, underwear and soft toys rank high on theirs list of favourite things to collect and present as gifts to their cherished family.

Framed Golden Retriever Print

Yet these dogs are so much more than a pretty face. Behind all the glamour lies a versatile and accomplished hunter who loves to be at one with nature. I always smile when I meet a mud-covered Golden out on a walk, fresh from romping through the undergrowth, wallowing in the mud and rolling in all manner of unmentionable substances. They simply love to have a good time with their people. What more could you ask from a dog?

The print combines my hand drawn lettering with illustration and each one is hand-printed on my press in a rich yellow ochre ink, then individually signed.

Prints are available both framed and unframed from my online shop

Hand Lettered Pug Print

The Enlightened Hound’s “Dog Tag” series of prints has a new addition – The Pug Print.

Hand printed Pug 'Dog Tag' Art by Debbie Kendall, The Enlightened Hound

I must admit that I didn’t know much about these popular little dogs before I started researching them for my latest Dog Tag breed story print. The pug is often characterised by the Latin phrase “multum in parvo” which means “much in little”. This refers to the fact that these little dogs have such huge personalities!

Hand lettered detail of Pug print by Debbie Kendall

Pugs have a fascinating history dating back to ancient China. Also known as Foo Dogs in the West, they were bred by the Chinese Imperial Family of ancient dynasties to resemble the sacred Chinese Guardian Lion. Historical documentation indicates that pugs could only be owned and bred by emperors ~ breaking this law was punishable by death.

A very desirable feature was the “W” shape in the forehead folds, which in Chinese letters meant prince.

Pugs were treasured companions who were held in the highest esteem. They lived in the lap of luxury, eating only the best food, with their own devoted attendants to look after them and special carriages to ride in (not that different from today then!)

Framed Pug Art Print by Debbie Kendall

Pugs have long been associated with royalty, favoured as companions by several European royal households. From a Russian princess to the Dutch king, William I, French ruler Louis XIV, and British monarchs, King William III, Mary II, Queen Victoria and Edward VII and more recently The Duke & Duchess of Windsor. A more royal pedigree could not be found!

Fame and fortune go hand in hand with these great little dogs. Other celebrity owners include Josephine Bonaparte, Winston Churchill, Andy Warhol, George Clooney and Grace Kelly.

Pugs have also been immortalised in many movies and books, perhaps the most famous of which is Frank the Pug in Men in Black – an extra-terrestrial living on Earth in the disguise of a pug!

The print combines my hand drawn lettering with illustration and each one is hand printed on my press in a rich deep orange/red – and individually signed. Available from my website both framed and unframed.

Also available are Labrador, Cocker Spaniel, Springer Spaniel, Whippet and Portuguese Water Dog. Up next is the Staffy!

The Whimsical Whippet Print

Here is the latest print in my series of Dog Tag prints that celebrate the story of a breed. This time it is the Whippet, and although I do not own a Whippet I do have rather a soft spot for them! I sometimes see a Whippet tearing across the common in my village and I love to see him, literally running like the wind, with reckless abandon.

The Oxford dictionary defines ‘whimsical’ as ‘playfully quaint or fanciful, especially in an appealing or amusing way’ and I feel that it sums up the Whippet perfectly. The Whippet has a wonderful history and, although there is no specific proof, it is thought to be an ancient breed, as Whippet-like dogs were depicted in the art of several ancient civilisations including the Romans and Ancient Egyptians.

Whippet Print by Debbie Kendall, The Enlightened Hound

As they are the fastest dogs, for their weight, they are the consummate sprinter and as such were prized by the British working classes  as racing dogs. At the end of the 19th century in Northern England and the Midlands, Whippet racing was taken extremely seriously, as a good racing Whippet could top up the family’s income quite significantly. Easier to come by and cheaper to buy and look after than a Greyhound, the Whippet was nicknamed the ‘poor man’s racehorse’.

Hand Lettered Whippet Print Detail by Debbie Kendall, The Enlightened Hound

They also made a useful poacher’s companion, being extremely adept at catching rabbits, yet small enough to hide under a coat. It is easy to see why these dogs were cherished by their families and were always given the choicest cuts of meat, even if the family had to ‘go without’.

Framed Whippet Print by The Enlightened Hound

Officially recognised as a breed in 1891, the Whippet with its affectionate, gentle nature, sleek, elegant lines and wise, soulful eyes is for me, a truly lovely dog.

Combining hand lettering and illustration and printed by hand on my press in a deep smoky blue/grey ink, each print is individually signed.

From The Enlightened Hound’s website.

“Quintessentially British” Hand Lettered Print

Quintessentially British Print

A little while ago I created this hand lettered poster for a competition entitled “All Things British”.

It is now available to buy as a limited edition, fine art Giclee print. Each print is signed and numbered – there are only 20 prints in the edition – which means there will only ever be 20 of these prints – so snap one up quickly from The Enlightened Hound.

Giclée, is used to describe a fine art digital printing process, which combines superior pigment-based inks with high quality archival quality paper to achieve prints of the same archival quality, light fastness and stability as that demanded by galleries and museums.

The Quintessentially British prints are printed on thick (310gsm) Hahnemuhle natural white cotton rag paper.

Quintessentially British Poster hand lettering by Debbie Kendall

The hand lettered print celebrates the unique, quirky traditions and rituals that are quintessentially British –  in very patriotic colours – red, white and blue.

The paper size is approx. 395 x 565 mm and the image size is approx. 315 x 485 mm.